Monthly Archives: June 2019

better ways to procrastinate?

Earlier this week, I set some goals for this month, including:

  • practicing my clarinet 5 out of 7 days every week
  • finishing one painting
  • posting on my blog at least twice a week about my progress

I had a few purposes for setting these goals, but my biggest reason for setting these goals was to help my mental health and keep myself busy.

So far, things are going well! Yesterday I painted and practiced, and got a few other things done too. But today… I feel like procrastinating.

I know that I’ll get around to practicing and painting before the day is over, but so far I have done only a few things, including catching Pokemon on Pokemon Go, using a face mask, and crocheting a coaster.

coasters

I’ve crocheted multiple coasters lately (usually while putting off another activity), and it has been pretty fun. One of the main ways that I procrastinate is by knitting or crocheting. You could call it “procrastiknitting”, I suppose.

When it comes to activities that can help better mental health, I find that procrastination is one of my worst enemies. For some reason, I often try to put off activities that will help me, even if they are activities I like. But there are some ways to put things off that are better than others.

I oftentimes procrastinate by simply watching videos on my phone or by going on social media. However, this has never left me feeling any better. Recently, I deactivated my social media in order to take a break, but I will still watch videos pretty often. Sometimes this is okay; there’s nothing wrong with watching a video or two while eating my dinner, but if I waste an entire afternoon on the couch with YouTube, I’ll probably find myself feeling pretty crummy later.

Procrastinating might never be a great thing, but there are ways to procrastinate more positively, and this can actually be helpful.

If you feel like procrastinating, try doing something active rather than passive. Put down the phone and find some way to create something, do something healthy, or treat yourself. These activities can help give you some active momentum. When you’re done, perhaps you’ll be able to do the thing you were putting off with less resistance from yourself.

Today I chose to procrastinate by making crafts and taking a walk outside while I caught Pokemon, and I definitely feel better and more motivated. Not a bad decision, at all. 🙂

What ways do you usually procrastinate? Are there better activities that you could choose?

What are the things in work or your personal life that you put off doing the most?

 

how can I create when I don’t feel like it?

People have claimed that the arts can help those who suffer with depression, anxiety, and other mental health struggles. I believe this is true. Yet as an artist, I find that there is sometimes nothing more difficult than actually engaging with the arts while I’m not feeling well.

I know that playing my clarinet, painting something new, or writing will help me, yet these are the things I lose desire for when I’m going through a rough patch. (This explains why I haven’t posted on my blog for a few weeks… Whoops.)

Many people experience this. Depression makes it difficult to put effort into anything beyond simple tasks, yet these tasks are the ones that can help you to start feeling like yourself again. It’s a cycle, and it can sometimes feel impossible to get out of.

The arts demand effort and confidence, and oftentimes daily practice. This is especially true for those who try to make a career out of them. But how can I make a daily practice out of something when I struggle to find the motivation to do it for even one day?

This is one of the things that I most want to explore this year through commitment to daily practice and writing about it on this blog.

I think a great way for me to get started on this is by setting goals. When setting goals, I’ve learned that it’s always important to set attainable goals, and to set small steps along the way. It’s important to be specific.

To get started, here are some attainable goals I want to set for myself this month:

  •  Practicing my clarinet 5 out of 7 days a week
  • 1 painting
  • Posting on this blog at least 2 times a week with thoughts on how things are going

To show how I will break one of these goals down and set smaller, specific steps, I’ll use the example of finishing one painting this month.

1. First, I’ll dedicate an hour to deciding what to paint and drawing a simple sketch of it. To make this even easier, I’ll pick a time to do that within the next two days and commit myself to that as a part of my schedule.

For this painting, I’m going to do this tonight after I get home from work.

2.  Next, I’ll think about my needs for this painting. I’ll need a canvas, paint, brushes, and water. I already have all these things, so my next step is deciding where I will set up my supplies. I don’t have a table for this in my apartment, so I need to get creative

I’ll use a garbage bag as a tarp by cutting open its seams and laying it on my floor. Then I can set up all of my supplies on top of it, and feel good about having protected my floor.

3. I pick a time to begin my painting. If if got leftover time tonight after drawing my sketch, I can start then. I’ll have additional work time tomorrow at 10am.

From there, I’ll decide additional steps as I go. I anticipate this painting to take me a minimum of 12 hours.

I might complete more than one painting this month, but by setting the goal of only doing one, I’ll feel accomplished if I manage that much, and I’ll feel especially great if I can manage more.

Depression and anxiety are hard, but they don’t need to hold me back from doing the things that I love. I can do the things that I love better when I break them down into small tasks.

What favorite activities of yours are difficult for you to do when you’re feeling down?

Do you have any goals for yourself this month? How can you break them down for yourself?